Exploring Edinburgh

Although these are strange and difficult times, there is some consolation in having the time to explore Edinburgh more – away from the main thoroughfares. It is a such a good way of getting to know and love my new home, as well as keeping things in perspective.

Take it Home

Most outdoor people and bloggers want everyone to enjoy the outdoors, but please respect the places that you go walking, whether it is the local park or the countryside.

Check the Scottish Outdoor Access Code for Scotland or the Countryside Code for England. Leave no trace of your visit so that you don’t spoil a day out for the next visitors. If you always remember to take a few rubbish bags out with you, it is easy to take your rubbish home with you after your walk. Simples.

Pentland Pootling

The Pentland Hills lay just beyond my radius when I was living on the border, so I was glad when a walking friend offered to introduce me to this lovely area in January of this year. The area is a straightforward bus journey from Edinburgh. I was just on the verge of venturing out to feature the area on this blog when the restrictions were introduced, so this is just a taster of an area I hope to focus on in future posts. I hope you are safe and well.

This post was created from my phone so I hope the layout is without issues.

Some Outdoor Films

These are some of the outdoor films I have enjoyed most since creating this blog:

  • Force Majeure (2014) Dir. by Ruben Östlund
  • Touching the Void (2003) Dir. by Kevin MacDonald
  • Into the Wild (2007) Dir. by Sean Penn
  • 127 Hours (2010) Dir. by Danny Boyle
  • Mountain (2017) Dir. by Jennifer Peedom
  • Wild (2014) Dir. by Jean-Marc Vallée
  • Walking Out (2017) Dir. by Alex & Andrew Smith

Let me know if you have any suggestions for outdoor people missing the hills

Suggestions: Valley Uprising (2014) Dir. by Peter Mortimer, Josh Lowell & Nick Rosen

Some Outdoor Books

Here are 9 of the outdoor books I have enjoyed most since creating this blog. All are available as downloads.

  • Out There: A Voice from the Wild – Chris Townsend
  • Ramble On – Sinclair McKay
  • The Hidden Ways – Alistair Moffat
  • Into Thin Air – Jon Krakauer
  • Wild – Cheryl Strayed
  • Into the Wild – Jon Krakauer
  • Walking Home – Simon Armitage
  • Cycling the Earth – Sean Conway
  • Balancing on Blue – Keith Foskett

Apologies for any formatting or settings issues as I am doing this from my phone which is a new venture. Feel free to suggest any books for other outdoor people with cabin fever.

Suggestions: The Salt Path by Raynor Winn

A Year in Scotland

Although my first complete year in Scotland has been a relatively quiet year since losing my father in July, I think I have made the right decision to move here after living on the border for 10 years. I have had some great day walks, trips and life experiences, which only living in Scotland could have afforded me. I wish you all a very happy and successful year for 2020 and hope you will return to my sites in the New Year.

Rosie 🌹

Hikerspace I

This post is intended to be an occasional feature showcasing some of the websites which I have enjoyed recently. I would welcome your suggestions about good sites.

Trail Angels
Trail Angels on Hadrian’s Wall

Chris Townsend Outdoors Blog by a very experienced backpacker with an impressive outdoor CV. Unparalleled knowledge of gear and environmental issues.

Grough Magazine An independently owned site featuring news and features about the outdoors and outdoor activities.

Hiking in Finland  A European backpacking blog in English written by the multi skilled Hendrick Morkel

Homemade Wanderlust  Blog and Vlog following trailhiker Dixie’s interesting and involving attempt to hike the Appalachian Trail, the Pacific Crest Trail and the Continental Divide Trail and become a hiking triple crowner.

John Muir Trust Founded in 1983 with the aim of conserving and protecting wild places for the benefit of present and future generations

Northumberland National Park This site is growing into a well researched and  interesting website about the area. They are quite responsive to comments and criticisms from users.

The Outdoors Station Podcast A professionally produced podcast covering many aspects of the outdoors from the Cartwrights at Backpacking Light UK

Scotland Outdoors Podcast A wide ranging, well informed and entertaining podcast about outdoor life in Scotland.

Tramplite Gear Ultralight long distance hiker who designs and makes his own line of hiking equipment when he isn’t hiking trails around the world.

Walk Highlands All aspects of walking in Scotland are covered in this engaging blog which has a good mix of trail data, downloads and long form posts. It is supported by accommodation providers who want to appeal to the outdoor market.

Rucksack Rose

Rucksack Readers; Coast to Coast Guide Review

Rucksack Readers: Coast to Coast, St Bees to Robin Hood’s Bay (2018).

This new edition of the Coast to Coast walk guide is produced in line with the range of Rucksack Reader editions from this Edinburgh publisher.

Rucksack Reader Cover: Coast to Coast

This Coast to Coast Guide is printed on weatherproof, biodegradeable paper and the spiral bindings enables the user to open it out flat. It is published in high spec full colour with photographs by Karen Frenkel. It also contains introductory sections to aid planning and preparation, well researched background information and a thorough final section of further information and references.

The walk is divided into 16 daily stages with concise directions, route options, altitude profiles and 1:55,000 colour maps by Lovell Johns. At 220mm x 150mm and 295g, the guide should fit in most garment or rucksack pockets, although it is slightly on the tall side for me. There is the option to download the Daily Stages section of the guide as a pdf which could be used during the walk as an alternative to carrying the book.  There is also some additional content and a downloadable GPX file available from their website.

On the whole the book has been thoughtfully produced, addressing some of the physical problems many walkers will have experienced with walking guides (rain damage and spine deterioration). I also appreciate the thoughtful extras such as the downloadable pdf guide and GPX file which allow the walker to get everything they require in a one stop shop.

Many walking books are self consciously low spec on the reasonable assumption that they will take a bit of rough handling during a walk. It is therefore quite nice to find a guide that subverts the trend by proving that quality doesn’t have to be sacrificed to durability.

This was a free review copy available on request from the publisher.

Top Publisher Award 2018

I have been digging my old trumpet out and dusting it off to receive this very exciting ViewRanger (Now Outdooractive) award, alongside 9 other distinguished recipients.

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Craig Wareham, Co-Founder and CEO of Viewranger, describes the annual award as follows:

‘The Top Publisher Award recognises people, organizations and publishers creating interesting, engaging, and high quality trail guide content. Each year, just ten outdoor organizations and authors receive our top award for contributing outstanding digital content, including route descriptions, turn-by-turn directions and photos to share with the growing outdoor community’

Press Release Image
All 10 of the 2018 Top Publisher Award Winners

By way of acknowledgement, the ViewRanger app has dragged my blog out of the dusty filing cabinets and card indexes where it was created, and into the digital present. The app provided me with exactly the tools I needed to make my routes accessible to a wider audience and to communicate directly with users.

Thanks to my followers and all at ViewRanger for making it happen for all my Rucksack Rosie sites. Please note that ViewRanger is now assimilated with the Outdooractive app which can be downloaded from the usual places.

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Rucksack Rosie – Avatars

Trail Magic

Or why you should walk a long distance trail.

I thought I would write a post regarding my love of walking Trails (listed under the Trails tab) to try and inspire you to walk a trail. After some cogitation I came up with the following factors which have inspired me:

  • You gain a sense of progress which is rare in real life
  • The world is a beautiful place
  • The kindness of strangers who want you to succeed
  • The unique perspective it provides on the places you walk through
  • The community of other hikers
  • The perspective it gives you on life’s problems
  • Nature, nature and nature
  • The sense of freedom and independence it can give you

But somehow this still didn’t convey my love of walking long distance paths. So, here are some pictures:

…..which is when I realised that I could fill a book.

Happy Trails 🏕⛰🏕👣💚 🌹